• | Getting Down to Facts II
  • | Fox and Hounds

    Some of the report’s broad conclusions have been covered in the media—especially the report’s finding that, despite improvements in California education, our kids start out behind kids in other states educationally and never catch up.

    That’s not surprising. What is shocking – or should be – was reading the report’s sections on how the state handles educational data. California is producing more such data, and has made improvements in its education data system.

  • | Times of San Diego

    A team of researchers managed by Stanford University and PACE — Policy Analysis for California Education — recently released a massive study of California schools’ successes and shortcomings.

    It concluded that for California’s elementary and secondary schools to reach academic performance goals, the state should expand education into early childhood, prior to kindergarten, and raise overall school spending by 32 percent.

    The report said that “while public schools in California spent about $69.7 billion on school operations in 2016-17, an additional $22.1 billion—32 percent above actual spending—would have been necessary for all students to have had the opportunity to meet the goals set by the state Board of Education.”

  • | Marin Independent Journal

    A team of researchers managed by Stanford University and Policy Analysis for California Education recently released a massive study of California schools’ successes and shortcomings.

    It concluded that for California’s elementary and secondary schools to reach academic performance goals, the state should expand education into early childhood, prior to kindergarten, and raise overall school spending by 32 percent.

    The report said that “while public schools in California spent about $69.7 billion on school operations in 2016-17, an additional $22.1 billion — 32 percent above actual spending — would have been necessary for all students to have had the opportunity to meet the goals set by the state Board of Education.”

  • | EdSource

    Two separate panels of experienced California teachers and administrators were given background information and three days together to help answer a longer version of this question: How much would it cost to provide all California students the academic knowledge, skills and opportunities they’ll need to successfully pursue their plans after high school and participate in civic life?

    “What Does It Cost to Educate California’s Students? A Professional Judgment Approach” details how the panels determined the amount of the funding increase and the reasoning behind it. The 78-page study and 224-page technical appendix will be one of the more closely scrutinized studies in Getting Down to Facts II, a compilation of 36 reports that was released Sept. 17. Stanford University and the university-affiliated nonprofit Policy Analysis for California Education, or PACE, coordinated the project.

  • | Voice of San Diego

    San Diego is to pension crises like Connecticut is to pizza: We may not make the most well-known, but we can cook them up with the very best.

    And if that remains true, we should be in for a grand ole time dealing with the ballooning pension costs for teachers and school workers across the state in coming years, according to a recent study out of Stanford University.

  • | Univision

    León Krauze habló con Lucrecia Santibañez, coautora de un estudio de la Universidad Stanford sobre educación, acerca de las medidas que puede adoptar el Distrito Escolar Unificado de Los Ángeles (LAUSD) para romper ese ciclo negativo.

  • | KUSI News

    California is under-funding its schools by $22 billion dollars, according to a new report released last week.

    Lauren Phinney sat down with Jennifer Imazeki PhD, Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at SDSU, to discuss the report.

  • | Education Week

    Despite investing in education data systems, California produces little information on how to provide an effective education for its students, according to a 36-study analysis by the Policy Analysis for California Education Center at Stanford University.

    The study finds that the Golden State has engaged in multiple education reform initiatives in the past decade—some of which have shown benefits—but has not built capacity in the state and districts to "ensure that educators and other practitioners have the skills, information, and materials they need to put major reforms more fully into practice."

  • | KQED News

  • | The San Diego Union Tribune

    A major research project released this week claims California has under-funded its schools by $22 billion, many California students are entering school already behind in learning and California schools don’t have nearly enough teachers, counselors and other personnel.

    The project, called Getting Down to Facts II, includes three dozen reports and 19 briefs that provide a comprehensive look at California’s education system as the state prepares to choose a new governor, state superintendent and legislators.

  • | KNX InDepth Podcast

    They haven't even walked into their first classroom....or met their first teacher....yet one study says California's children are already falling behind and may not catch up.

  • | KQED

    California's public school students score well below the national average in reading and math, and fall behind before they even enter kindergarten. That's according to the Getting Down to Facts Project, a wide-ranging study by Stanford and Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). The study also found that while overall student performance has improved over the last decade, the state has made only limited progress in closing achievements gaps for Black, Latino and low-income students. We'll talk about the challenges facing California's schools and early education programs and what can be done to improve them.

  • | Capitol Public Radio

    Researchers from Stanford University and Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE) released a new study on K-12 education in California this week.

    Dr. Susanna Loeb, Principal Investigator, and Dr. Heather Hough, Executive Director of PACE will join us to discuss their findings.

  • | Santa Cruz Sentinel

    Sweeping reforms to the way California funds its public schools appear to be lifting student achievement, but this state may need to do and spend much more, particularly on early childhood education, if Californians hope to keep up with the rest of the country in closing its “achievement gap.”

    That’s the takeaway from an extensive research effort unveiled this week, the latest dispatch in a 10-year-old collective policy effort by California education scholars.

  • | KNSF

    A new research study says California children are behind before they even enter kindergarten. NBC 7's Rory Devine has more on what this research means.

  • | LA Times

    When students enter school in California, they learn at a pace on par with — if not better than — those in other states. The problem is that they arrive far behind their national peers, and they never catch up.

  • | Capitol Public Radio

    California is lagging behind other states in properly overseeing the rise of charter schools and needs to do more to close the achievement gap for English learners, according to a research report released on Monday.

  • | CALmatters

    Sweeping reforms to the way California funds its public schools appear to be lifting student achievement, but this state may need to do and spend much more, particularly on early childhood education, if Californians hope to keep up with the rest of the country in closing its “achievement gap.”

    That’s the takeaway from an extensive research effort unveiled this week, the latest dispatch in a 10-year-old collective policy effort by California education scholars.

  • | KPBS

    In the report, researchers across the country say the Local Control Funding Formula passed under Gov. Jerry Brown has put California schools on the right track.